The ULS-500 PRO can be configured in many ways in order to facilitate industry leading dynamic laser scanning, enabling large assets to be captured from multiple angles in the highest resolution. It can also be used in stationary mode to capture specific assets in high detail.

Brochure

Key Features

Dynamic Scanning Solution

Real-time 3D point cloud generation with on-the-fly inspection for infinite scan range

Ongoing deployments by leading offshore operators to survey the world’s subsea assests

High-Resolution Results

Generates true-scale 3D point clouds with industry leading resolution

High-density point cloud data for identification of small features, defects, and accurate measurements

Deployment Flexibility

Ready for use with AUVs, ROVs, Hybrids, Surface Vehicles and Divers

4000m water depth rating, with maximum scan range of over 15m

Performance
Scan RangeMinimum: 1.5m (4.92′) | Maximum: 20m (65.6′)
Points Per Laser Line2048
Angle of View50° (in water)
68° (in air)
Laser Line Resolution0.024° (in water)
1.3mm at 3m | 4.5mm at 10m | 8.9mm at 20m
Profile to Profile Resolution8.3mm at 0.5 Knot (0.25 m/s) | 33.3mm at 2 Knot (1 m/s) | 66.7 mm at 4 Knot (2.0 m/s)
Sample RateUp to 61440 points/sec | 30 profiles/sec
Depth Rating4000m

Application Fields

PIPELINE INSPECTION

VIEW MORE

DYNAMIC METROLOGY

VIEW MORE

STATIONARY METROLOGY

VIEW MORE

SHIPWRECK SURVEY

VIEW MORE

PIPELINE INSPECTION

AUV-based laser mapping using 2G Robotics’ ULS-500 dynamic laser scanner improves inspection quality while reducing survey time & costs.

  • In 2014, the team at Oceaneering, known for their innovative approach to surveying, was faced with a difficult task: to develop a way to reduce pipeline survey costs while maintaining the quality of the data captured. The team emerged with a simple yet revolutionary plan to perform these surveys using Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs). With the ability to travel 6 times faster and to host a multitude of sensors, AUVs provided a dynamic platform from which pipeline surveys could be completed in a fraction of the time compared to conventional methods. However, faster vehicle speeds demanded sensors with higher capture rates to ensure high-quality data and resolution.
  • Oceaneering approached 2G Robotics in an effort to solve their latest challenge. Through substantial levels of collaboration and teamwork, 2G Robotics and Oceaneering were able to develop an optimal solution for sub-centimetric pipeline inspections.
    • With the aim of delivering unprecedented data, Oceaneering integrated ULS-500s into their fleet of Hugin AUVs; the systems were depth rated to 3000m and equipped with a wideband acoustic positioning transponder, an altimeter, a pressure sensor, an ultra-short baseline system, an inertial navigation system (INS), and a Doppler velocity log (DVL). On average, the operation speed of AUV was 3.0 to 3.5 knots. The calibration of the ULS-500s was completed in an on-shore testing facility and further calibrations were not required for the remainder of the missions.
    • With the aim of delivering unprecedented data, Oceaneering integrated ULS-500s into their fleet of Hugin AUVs; the systems were depth rated to 3000m and equipped with a wideband acoustic positioning transponder, an altimeter, a pressure sensor, an ultra-short baseline system, an inertial navigation system (INS), and a Doppler velocity log (DVL). On average, the operation speed of AUV was 3.0 to 3.5 knots. The calibration of the ULS-500s was completed in an on-shore testing facility and further calibrations were not required for the remainder of the missions.
  • The final data was processed to create a seamless mosaic of the survey areas, which was then integrated into a GIS mapping package. This approach allowed the Oceaneering team to compare different data sets and robustly understand the area.
  • Between 2014 and 2016 Oceaneering completed over 1000 km of laser micro-bathymetric mapping with sub-centimetric resolution using 2G Robotics’ ULS-500. The accepted accuracy was consistently met and in most cases survey lines exceeded the target accuracy.
  • Accelerated Survey Time
    AUVs complete laser micro-bathymetric mapping in a fraction of the time needed for ROV-based surveys.
  • Detailed Survey Results
    3D models with sub-centimetric resolution reveal fine-scale dimensional features not captured by other methods.
  • Improved Operational Efficiency
    Less time in the field drives down costs and allows personnel to spend more time on critical analysis.
  • Effortless Integration and Calibration
    Straightforward integration and calibrations are completed in laboratory saving field time for surveying.

DYNAMIC METROLOGY

DOF Subsea uses 2G Robotics’ Dynamic Laser Scanning to reduce the cost of their subsea metrology operations.

  • n December 2016 at The Underwater Centre in Fort William, Scotland, DOF Subsea (DOF) arranged a demonstration of dynamic underwater laser scanning as a replacement for traditional metrology techniques. The demo showcased 2G Robotics’ underwater laser scanner, the ULS-500 PRO, and Sonardyne’s inertial navigation sensor, SPRINT; Syrinx DVL and 6G acoustics. Seatronics, channel partner for 2G Robotics and provider of Sonardyne rental equipment, provided sensors and project/technician support.

    Traditional metrology campaigns using Long BaseLine (LBL) acoustics and photogrammetry demand significant vessel and ROV time. LBL requires physical interaction with the subsea assets and photogrammetry is unable to provide real-time results. The goal of the demo was to quantify the operational time reduction and accuracy of dynamic laser scanning for subsea metrology.

  • Two structures each containing four flanges were placed on the seafloor with an approximate baseline distance of 18m. The control measurement for the analysis was established by an LBL acoustic technique with flange orientations provided by installed gyro frames.

    A Triton XL ROV was fitted with 2G Robotics’ ULS-500 PRO and Sondardyne’s SPRINT positioning solution. The ULS- 500 PRO was mounted at 30° to capture the side facing hubs, upward facing hubs, and seabed in a single scan pass over the 18m baseline. With each scan run taking only 4 minutes, the ROV performed multiple redundant runs from structure-to-structure at an altitude of approximately 3m.

    The data was transmitted to the surface in real-time, processed through EIVA navigational software, and then through DOF’s Metro Prep software for automated metrology analysis. From these high-resolution point clouds, exact measurements were taken to facilitate the fabrication of spools and jumpers while concurrently providing as-built condition assessments.

  • Four runs were performed at 4 minutes a run. The measurements of the vertical jumper metrology and the horizontal spool metrology were within accepted industry tolerances. The results of the trial highlighted the following key benefits of Dynamic Laser Scanning for metrology applications:

    Reduced Survey Time
    Significant reduction in the time to gather the data when compared to other techniques.

    Real-time Data
    Delivery of final metrology measurements offshore within hours of data acquisition.

    Contactless
    No physical interaction with assets is required.

    Flexible Deployment
    Configurable mounting orientations on ROVs for specific survey applications.

    More than Metrology
    The 3D model used for metrology serves as an As-Built model of the subsea installation and the surrounding area to provide a baseline for future intervention work.

STATIONARY METROLOGY

2G Robotics enabled Subsea 7 to scan multiple spools as well as the surrounding area, creating both a detailed model for metrology measurements.

UTEC StarNet, Seatronics, and 2G Robotics completed a spool metrology project for Subsea 7 using underwater laser scanning as part of the overall solution to achieve the required measurement accuracy that could not be attained using acoustic techniques. The end customer’s objective was to design five spool pieces to connect a newly installed bundle towhead to five previously laid spool pieces.

To obtain towhead and spool piece positions and headings, acoustic LBL was used. Survey specifications, however, dictated that a 6 metre long acoustic baseline to derive at an acoustic heading was insufficient. 2G Robotics’ ULS-500 high precision laser scanner provided the additional dimensional control needed to obtain the necessary measurement accuracy that could not be achieved using a 6 metre long acoustic baseline.

The metrology was conducted in the North Sea at a depth of 90m; two of 2G Robotics’ ULS-500 laser systems were utilized. The ULS-500 with rotary actuator and tripod was deployed by the WROV. A gripping frame was added to the standard mount location of the ULS-500 so that the WROV’s manipulators could grab the system to position it on the seabed. The system was tethered to the WROV and the WROV’s fibre optic umbilical cable was used to communicate with topside operators for real-time data acquisition.

The center flange was positioned within the LBL acoustic array using the two saddle mounted transponders with control spheres that were deployed onto the largest of the five spools by the WROV. To complete the high precision dimensional control survey of the towhead structure with flanges, 2G Robotics’ ULS-500 performed 360° scans at multiple locations around the spools, with each scan capturing both the key flange pipeline components and the control spheres attached to the two pipeline saddles.

The traditional LBL survey approach would have required an entire day for this operation. With the ULS-500, in only eight scans and 3.5 hours, the scanner captured the flanges, bundle towhead, beacons, control spheres, and surrounding environment. Since 2G Robotics’ ULS-500 system is factory calibrated, no time-consuming calibrations were needed during deployment. Whereas the traditional approach would have yielded only one point per beacon, the laser scanning approach generated a complete 3D model comprised of 14.6 million points, notably improving the accuracy for designing the spools.

SHIPWRECK SURVEY

2G Robotics Dynamic Laser Scanner produces high precision 3D models of the U-576, the German submarine that sunk during The Battle of the Atlantic

In 2014, The Battle for the Atlantic, a previously unknown WWII battlefield was discovered off the coast of North Carolina. However, at a depth of 700 feet, the site was too deep for divers to explore. NOAA turned to a trusted collaborator, 2G Robotics, for an effective way to understand the newly identified battlefield. NOAA and 2G Robotics previously collaborated in early 2014 and again in spring of 2016 to document shipwrecks in the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary.

For this new project, 2G Robotics provided its most-advanced, longest range underwater laser scanner, the ULS-500 PRO, to dynamically capture true-scale 3D models of the site. Dynamic underwater laser scanning has quickly become the future of marine archaeology and research. 2G Robotics’ underwater laser scanners have been used on all seven continents for a range of underwater inspections including the high profile Costa Concordia salvage operation and HMS Erebus exploration.

The ULS-500 PRO was mounted to a Triton 1000/2 free-moving, battery-powered submarine along with Sonardyne’s acoustically aided inertial navigation system (AAINS), SPRINT, for positioning. The ULS-500 PRO was mounted perpendicular to the seabed, facing downwards in order to capture the port side, bow, and stern of the U-Boat in a single pass over a 65m baseline.

Survey of U-576

In adverse conditions, the Triton 1000/2 operated at a speed of 0.5 knots, which allowed for a single pass to be completed in 7 minutes. A complete 3D model of U-576 was able to be constructed from only 4 passes, however, multiple redundant runs were performed to ensure further accuracy. NOAA was able to achieve a total of two dives on the site. Each dive was composed of 8 passes at an altitude of approximately 7m.

The raw laser point cloud data and navigational data were recorded and processed through EIVA navigational software providing real-time display of data. The point clouds were filtered by intensity and as a result of being geo-referenced, a 3D model was developed without the use of stitching.

Sixteen runs over a 65m baseline were performed at 7 minutes per run. The results of the project highlighted the following key benefits of Dynamic Laser Scanning for shipwreck scanning applications:
Detailed In-Situ Survey
High resolution 3D models reveal fine-scale dimensional features not captured by other methods.

Site Preservation
3D models document the present day condition of the site without the need for physical interaction

Reduced Survey Time
Significant reduction in the time to gather data when compared to other techniques.

Adaptability
Dynamic nature of the deployment allows for adjustment of survey methodology to deliver results despite unexpected adverse conditions.

Educational Engagement
The comprehensive 3D model enables virtual interaction with the site for use in research, educational outreach, and public programming.