The ULS-200 is deployable by divers, ROVs, crawlers, centralizers, and frames. Its range and size make it perfect for projects that are small in scale but require maximum detail.

Brochure

Key Features

Mid-Range, Small Form Factor

Generates point clouds of targets such as large pipes, tunnels, damaged structures, and other underwater objects.

Increased range and coverage compared to the ULS-100 with a slight increase in size

Operational Efficiency

Simple, configurable deployment and ease-to-use interface for rapid data acquisition.

No user calibration required

High Resolution Measurements

Mid-range scans (0.25m to 2.5m range) with 50° laser swath and 360° rotation

Real-time and true-scale model generation

Performance
Scan RangeMinimum: 0.36m (1.2′) | Maximum: 2.5m (8.2′)
Points Per Profile480
Angle of View50° (in water)
68° (in air)
Rotational Coverage360°
Laser Line Resolution0.1042° (in water)
0.70mm at 0.36m | 2.72mm at 1.4m | 4.86mm at 2.5m0.1412° (in air)
1.01mm at 0.36m | 3.93mm at 1.4m | 7.02mm at 2.5m
Rotational Resolution0.018°
0.11mm at 0.36m | 0.44mm at 1.4m | 0.79mm at 2.5m
Sample RateUp to 4750 points/sec | 9.9 profiles/sec

Application Fields

OIL FIELD ASSETS

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WATER TUNNELS

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I-TUBE INSPECTION

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ICE RESEARCH

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OIL FIELD ASSETS

2G Robotics with Total Marine Technology demonstrated the efficacy of the underwater laser scanners for detailed and comprehensive asset modelling.

  • Total Marine Technology (TMT) is an Australian company that provides locally built Work Class Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV’s) and intervention tooling designed specifically for the offshore drilling and production industry. TMT sought to test 2G Robotics’ ULS-200 by scanning a Subsea Intervention Device (SID), an H4 Wellhead Connector with ROV Interface Panel, and a Light Well Intervention (LWI) Device. Those three pieces of equipment were scanned in an open air environment. Two smaller objects, a short pipe with a flange welded to it and an aluminum cylinder, were also scanned during the trials. Those two objects were scanned in an open air environment as well as in water in a test tank.
  • The scans were conducted at a range of 2.5m from the target objects and were registered using overlapping areas of adjacent scans. The data processing was primarily completed using the open source software, CloudCompare. TMT also used Hexagon’s 3D Reshaper to create a mesh from the point cloud data and then overlay a photo taken with an SLR camera on the mesh. After processing the data, TMT measured points within a single point cloud and within the merged clouds of each object. TMT then obtained physical measurements to compare to the measurements obtained from the point clouds to validate the accuracy of the system. The comparison confirmed the ability of the ULS-200 to provide millimetre-level measurement accuracy point to point for a single object and point to point between separate objects.
  • The tests definitively showed the superiority of 2G Robotics’ Laser Scanners over the current methods TMT had been employing. TMT Survey Manager, Adam Hamilton, stated that “the ULS-200 performed equally well in both environments” and Technical Coordinator, Roger Garnett, commented on how the ability of the ULS-200 to “store data directly to the command computer allowed for fast quality control and prompt post-processing capabilities.”Hamilton went on to say “the ULS-200 proved to perform to the highest degree of accuracy and precision.” With the purchase of a system, TMT has begun using the scanner to obtain accurate dimensional information for applications including “damage analysis of objects such as cracks and deformation, marine growth measurement, and pipe and flange face measurements.

WATER TUNNELS

2G Robotics enabled the City of Bellingham to accurately model the current state of their main water-supply tunnel.

  • The City of Bellingham was seeking a way to inspect their main water-supply tunnel without adding stress by draining the tunnel as they had historically done. The goal of the inspection was to assess the current condition and shape of the tunnel. Without an inspection, the city would have been placed in a position where they may be performing repair and replacement to viable sections of tunnel based on the original design life, while compromised sections of tunnel go unrepaired because of a lack of information.
  • The city elected to use an Inuktun Versatrax 300 crawler fitted with a 2G Robotics’ ULS-200 underwater laser scanner and a camera for the inspection. While the camera was used to capture video over the entire length of the tunnel, the ULS-200 was used to take scans at regular intervals. These scans produced a 3D model of the internal wall of the tunnel with millimetre level resolution. Unlike traditional single profile scanners, the position and orientation of the scanner head relative to the tunnel did not have to be controlled in order to acquire accurate measurements. Since the ULS-200 obtains complete swaths of data, the data can be digitally rotated to view the true tunnel profile.The goal of this inspection was to measure small features and variations in the tunnel geometry over its length. Traditional video inspection does not obtain measurement data and sonar only provides rough overall shape information. By using the ULS-200 to obtain dimensional information about specific features, such as cracks and deformations, an engineering evaluation was done to determine if these defects are of concern and what remedial actions, if any, should be taken.
  • The ULS-200 created both localized fine detail measurements, as well as provided an overall picture of the geometry of the entire tunnel. This provided the City of Bellingham with high resolution geometric information about their raw water intake. Based on this information, the city now has baseline geometric data that can be used to assess with mm resolution how aspects of the tunnel geometry change over time. In particular, the regions where small but potentially critical changes to the overall shape of the tunnel occur will be of particular interest on future inspections. This ability to retroactively compare features of interest is only possible because 2G Robotics’ ULS-200 provides a comprehensive model of the tunnel in its current state.

I-TUBE INSPECTION

Using a 2G Robotics’ ULS-200, Ocean Atlantic Petroleum was able to fully model an I-Tube as part of a project for a major oil and gas supplier.

Ocean Atlantic Petroleum planned to install a 6” power umbilical through an existing submerged I-tube. In order to do so, they were required to both machine 36 holes into the tube to allow for the proper dispersion of heat generated by the cabling and also assess the current internal state of the asset. This posed a substantial challenge for Ocean Atlantic Petroleum as the confined space of the tube interior limited the approaches they could employ and the level of required accuracy further disqualified many technologies. Historically, such a survey would have been completed using caliper pigging – however these methods suffer from both the inaccuracies of the calipers sensors and operational challenges as a result of the size required for such large tubes. As such, they selected laser scanning for the project as 2G Robotics’ laser scanners offered better than required resolution, while easily operating in the small space available.
The I-tube inspection was performed using 2G Robotics’ ULS-200 underwater laser scanner deployed on a spring actuated pipe centralizer. The laser scanner was lowered down the tube, performing 66 scans, each capturing an approx. 1m section of tube. The goal of the scans was to identify the hole distances from the top of the I-tube, the hole orientation with respect to the pipe centerline and FPSO hull, the expected versus as-surveyed hole locations and orientations and a summary of the inner diameter cross-sections for every 1m of tube.
TThe result of the survey was a complete as-built model of the I-tube. This model illustrated not only the orientation of the holes and the diameter of the pipe, but also the specific characteristics of any identified irregularities. As a result, where anomalies were observed Ocean Atlantic Petroleum was able to further examine them and understand their specific impact on the project. The ability to provide superior resolution and accuracy on the required measurements, while simultaneously providing insight into the general characteristics of the I-tube led the project to be a clear success.

ICE RESEARCH

2G Robotics enabled NYU to study the formation of ice scallops in real-time and high-resolution.

Dr. David Holland and Mitch Bushuk of the Department of Math & Atmospheric Ocean Science at New York University sought a way to efficiently monitor Ice Scallop formations. The goal was to understand how ice scallops reacted with the ocean environment, and their natural propagation and change over time. Since Ice Scallops measure only a couple centimetres, millimeter level changes could represent significant alterations in the scallop structure. As such, Holland and Bushuk selected a 2G Robotics’ ULS-100 as a key piece of their testing apparatus. The underwater laser scanner provided detailed 3D point cloud data of ice scallop models.
The ULS-100 was used to scan the surface of an ice sheet in a Flume tank to examine Ice Scallop formations. The as the scanner was utilized underwater, the data was collected with no disruption to the Ice Scallops. The ULS-100 scanned the sheets with no contact allowing detailed 3D point cloud models to be constructed. Additionally, the speed of the scans and the resolution of the laser allowed the Ice Scallop structure to be captured at precise times and with significant detail. This enable the Ice Scallops to be scanned over a period of time to create a detailed 3D time lapse model of the changes observed.
The detailed scan data generated helped the researchers to better understand the conditions under which Ice Scallops form and also enabled them to analyze the Ice Scallop melt rates as a function of time and space in order to better predict environmental effects and fluid flow dynamics over ice. The millimeter accuracy of the laser scanner allowed for precise measurements to be made from the models. Additionally, because 3D point clouds were generated for the duration of the scans, any details that later became of interest were measurable. Typically, when analyzing a particular aspect of a subject the researcher must pre-emptively determine the measurements required. 2G Robotics underwater laser scanner allow measurements to be taken after the fact.