The ULS-100 is deployable by divers, ROVs, crawlers, centralizers, and frames. Its rugged and compact design makes it perfect for operation in confined spaces.

Brochure

Key Features

Deployable in Confined Spaces

Generates point clouds of targets such as pipes, tunnels, wells, and other underwater objects.

Small form factor and short range enables scanning in tight areas

High Resolution Measurements

Short-range scans (0.13m to 1m range) with 50° laser swath and 360° rotation.

Real-time and true-scale model generation.

Operational Efficiency

Simple, configurable deployment and ease-to-use interface for rapid data acquisition.

No user calibration required.

Performance
Scan RangeMinimum: 0.13m (0.43′) | Maximum: 1m (3.3′)
Points Per Profile480
Angle of View50° (in water)
68° (in air)
Laser Line Resolution0.1042° (in water)
0.25mm at 0.13m | 1.16mm at 0.6m | 1.94mm at 1m0.1412° (in air)
0.36mm at 0.13m | 1.69mm at 0.6m | 2.81mm at 1m
Rotational Resolution0.018°
0.03mm at 0.13m | 0.19mm at 0.6m | 0.31mm at 1m
Sample RateUp to 4750 points/sec | 9.9 profiles/sec

Application Fields

SEDIMENT TRANSPORT

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CORAL ANALYSIS

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WELL INSPECTION

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BRIDGE SCOUR

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SEDIMENT TRANSPORT

2G Robotics’ underwater laser scanners allowed Genex Systems to effectively and accurately model bridge scour and sediment transportation.

  • Genex Systems is a SDB Engineering, Scientific Research, and Information Technology services firm headquartered in Newport News, Virginia. Genex Systems was looking for a solution for modelling bridge scour and analyzing sediment transportation. The goal was to use a robotic arm to perform both dynamic and stationary scans with a 2G Robotics ULS-100 Laser Scanner. Tests were performed at the TFHRC J. Sterling Jones Hydraulics Research Laboratory in order to observe the capabilities of the scanner compared to incumbent technologies.
  • Sediment transport occurs in bodies of water as a result of current and tidal movement. Information obtained from sediment bed form analysis helps to determine areas where erosion or deposition will occur and aids with understanding bridge scouring. Genex Systems previously used a point laser distance sensor for bathymetry scanning work. The system was reliable and provided decent resolutions, but it did not work underwater.To demonstrate the capabilities of the 2G Robotics ULS-100, the scanner was attached to a robotic arm which was mounted to an automated carriage that allowed the arm to move along the length of the trial channel. With this setup, power and communication were provided through the robotic arm and tests could be performed to gauge the measurement resolution capabilities of the ULS-100. This setup allowed the laser scanner to be operated in profile mode to dynamically scan the sediment bed load using a known constant linear velocity, specified by Genex Systems.
  • The tests were decisive and led to Genex Systems purchasing multiple units. Oscar Suaznabar, Research Hydraulic Engineer, stated that the ULS-100 produced “a stunning footprint laser line resolution of 0.83mm” at a scanning speed of 20mm/s.Additionally, when scanning a small dolosse on the floor of the channel, the ULS-100 was able to capture the contour perimeter between the dolosse and the highly erodible channel bed. Understanding this contour is useful for monitoring the performance of scour countermeasures, such as dolosse or riprap, in the lab. Suaznabar noted that compared to a photo, “the laser scanning data made it notably easier to understand the contouring.”Ultimately, Suaznabar explained that previously measuring the required space “was a matter of days. With the ULS-100, obtaining high resolution measurement data for a comparable area is a matter of minutes.”

CORNAL ANALYSIS

WELL INSPECTION

2G Robotics’ underwater laser scanner enabled Lotowater Technical Services to accurately assess the current state of a submerged well pump.

Lotowater Technical Services wanted to design a custom tool to remove a 20 year old pump from the bottom of a well located at the Cambridge Water Treatment Facility. Additionally, a liner had been installed above the pump and there was concern about the ability to extract the section of interest through the liner. As such, measurements were required to determine the pipe diameter at the top of the pump assembly in order to design the tool to the right specifications. Lotowater requested to use a 2G Robotics ULS-100 underwater laser scanner in order to obtain the diameter of the pump assembly.
The well had an initial diameter of approximately 350mm which steps up to 550mm prior to the depth of the pump. The pump was fully submerged and located at a depth of approximately 44m from the top of the well. The desired scan area was approximately 250mm in diameter.

The ULS-100 emits a laser plane with a 50 degree swath which projects a laser line on the target surface. The optical sensor measures the angles that laser light scatters back to the scanner and uses this information to calculate x, y, z coordinates of 480 points along the laser line. The scanner head is then rotated and an adjacent profile of points along the laser line is captured. By repeating this process the ULS-100 produces a 3D point cloud representation of the object being scanned. The ULS-100 is capable of 360 degree rotation which makes it ideal for profiling the inside of wells, pipes, and shafts. The scanner was therefore lowered into the well at known distances to capture segments of the well. These segments could then be stitched together to get comprehensive information regarding the well’s structure.

The ULS-100 generated a true-scale 3D point cloud of the current condition of the well, pump and liner. From this point cloud, measurements could be taken to accurately assess the requirements for the tool to be built. Precise requirements could be modeled and the laser data provided confidence in the investment in the project.

BRIDGE SCOUR

2G Robotics’ underwater laser scanners allowed Genex Systems to effectively and accurately model bridge scour and sediment transportation.

Genex Systems is a SDB Engineering, Scientific Research, and Information Technology services firm headquartered in Newport News, Virginia. Genex Systems was looking for a solution for modelling bridge scour and analyzing sediment transportation. The goal was to use a robotic arm to perform both dynamic and stationary scans with a 2G Robotics ULS-100 Laser Scanner. Tests were performed at the TFHRC J. Sterling Jones Hydraulics Research Laboratory in order to observe the capabilities of the scanner compared to incumbent technologies.
Sediment transport occurs in bodies of water as a result of current and tidal movement. Information obtained from sediment bed form analysis helps to determine areas where erosion or deposition will occur and aids with understanding bridge scouring. Genex Systems previously used a point laser distance sensor for bathymetry scanning work. The system was reliable and provided decent resolutions, but it did not work underwater.

To demonstrate the capabilities of the 2G Robotics ULS-100, the scanner was attached to a robotic arm which was mounted to an automated carriage that allowed the arm to move along the length of the trial channel. With this setup, power and communication were provided through the robotic arm and tests could be performed to gauge the measurement resolution capabilities of the ULS-100. This setup allowed the laser scanner to be operated in profile mode to dynamically scan the sediment bed load using a known constant linear velocity, specified by Genex Systems.

The tests were decisive and led to Genex Systems purchasing multiple units. Oscar Suaznabar, Research Hydraulic Engineer, stated that the ULS-100 produced “a stunning footprint laser line resolution of 0.83mm” at a scanning speed of 20mm/s.

Additionally, when scanning a small dolosse on the floor of the channel, the ULS-100 was able to capture the contour perimeter between the dolosse and the highly erodible channel bed. Understanding this contour is useful for monitoring the performance of scour countermeasures, such as dolosse or riprap, in the lab. Suaznabar noted that compared to a photo, “the laser scanning data made it notably easier to understand the contouring.”

Ultimately, Suaznabar explained that previously measuring the required space “was a matter of days. With the ULS-100, obtaining high resolution measurement data for a comparable area is a matter of minutes.”